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 by Michael J Wood[1]

Abstract

As part of an ongoing project to compile the pedigrees of every family at Dedham, Essex before c.1700, the rolls for that period of the manor courts that had jurisdiction in the parish have been abstracted by the author. They form the backbone of this account of the family of Gurdon. Because Gurdon of Assington, Suffolk, and all the barons Cranworth, are descended from this family, the medieval generations have been published several times in outline, but the generations in Dedham were incomplete and inaccurate. This article aims to provide a definitive account of the family. John Coggeshall who migrated to New England in 1632, the wife of Herbert Pelham who migrated in 1639 and the wife of Richard Saltonstall who emigrated in 1631, are Gurdon descendants, as shown in this article. Herbert and Jemima Pelham had no issue, but there are many Coggeshall and Saltonstall descendants.

Foundations (2014) 6: 82-101     © Copyright FMG and the author

Contents[Hide]

 

Introduction

Dedham, Essex, lies in the Stour Valley, about 7 miles north-east of Colchester. It was a cloth-working village in late medieval times and had become a prosperous small market town by the 16th century. The local landscape famously provided the inspiration for the paintings of John Constable (1776-1837).[1]

The manorial courts in medieval England were a key part of the justice system and could deal with most petty civil or criminal offences at local level, including property disputes and land conveyancing.[2] As stated by Chris Phillips, “Manorial documents are among the few types of records where genealogical information about ordinary people - rather than the upper classes - is likely to survive from medieval times.” [3]

As part of an ongoing project to compile the pedigrees of every family at Dedham before c.1700, the author has abstracted relevant information for that period from the rolls of the manor courts that had jurisdiction in the parish, namely Dedham Campesse (DC) (which in the 1530s after the dissolution of the monasteries was renamed Overhall and Netherhall (ON)) and Dedham Hall (DH), both at The National Archives (TNA), together with Faites & Wades (FW) which is at the Essex Record Office. The eventual aim would be to compile all the families into a “town genealogy”. A study on Henry Sherman of Dedham, the ancestries of his wives, and descendants to c.1650 has been serialised in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register.[4] Data on many more families are yet to be compiled. This article focuses on the family of Gurdon, showing how its members (like a number of other local families) became wealthy by the acquisition of land in Dedham, especially in the 15th century, almost certainly as clothiers.

The great migration to New England[5] in the 1630s included, from Dedham: Angier, Butter (daughters), Cooper, Glover (daughters), Gurdon (daughters), Ravens (daughters), Sherman, and Sparhawke.

The family of Gurdon of Assington, Suffolk, and all the Barons Cranworth, are descended from this family, and the medieval generations have been published several times in skeleton form. The best previous account was by Moriarty[6] but without the maiden names of wives in the direct line, before Anne Colman. His translations and interpretations of the presentments are not always correct, and he missed some that are relevant.

Manor court rolls are identified in the text by the two letter abbreviations given above. Records not otherwise identified are from Dedham Campesse (DC). Dates in the original rolls were given in relationship to saints’ days and the regnal year but for the purpose of this article have been converted to modern format. Thus “Thursday after the translation of St Stephen, 4 Henry IV,” is shown as 28 Dec 1402 (see Appendix). All the proposed years of birth and almost all proposed years of marriage before about 1560 here are conjectural, and may be several years out, but are given to show that the pedigree is chronologically possible.

Table of descent

The pedigrees begin with ADAM de GURDON who died before 1216, from whom, fourth in descent, was JOHN GURDON, merchant of London. We begin with his son and heir:

  1. THOMAS GURDON, d. 1436; m. .................

    This man is said to have bought the manor of Clyne, which has not been identified, in Kent, and his son and heir was:
    1. John "of Clyne", b. say 1380. [2]

      Thomas probably had two other sons:

    2. Robert, b. say 1382. [3]
    3. Simon, b. say 1384; m. Christian. At Dedham on 22 April 1406 John Stor let 1½ acres of the tenement Longs to Simon and Christian for 3 years. On 24 Sept 1409 the lady of the manor let to them the north end of the manor hall for 10 years. On 6 Oct 1410 Agnes Warde was fined one penny because she did not prosecute a suit of debt against Simon Gurdon. He was not mentioned again. No record of children.
  2. JOHN GURDON (perhaps 1.i), b. say 1380, d.................; m. say 1409 JOAN FYBRIGGE, daughter of William Fybrigge of Dedham.

    On 24 Sept 1409 William Fybrigge surrendered to John one close of meadow, half an acre, which on 14 Nov 1426 John surrendered to John Skulton, witnessed by his brother Robert. Also on 24 Sept 1409 the lady of the manor let 3 rods of meadow in Cheldwell to John for 10 years. She also let to Roger Eyr and John Gurdon 3 acres in Lorebrigge meadow for 10 years. On 12 May 1411 John "fell by inquest" against Christian Cancelor and against Roger Eyr in pleas of trespass.

    In the published pedigrees John son of Thomas is identified as father of John [4] of Dedham. If true, and his residence was in Kent, it would explain why his only mention in DC court rolls after 1411 was when he surrendered his only piece of land in Dedham in 1426. His brother Robert, who witnessed the sale, had lived in Dedham for several years. However, whilst this could explain why John [4] does not appear in Dedham records before 1470 (due to living on his father's estate in Kent) John [4] married into a Dedham family about 1440. Was this because his wife's family and his brother Robert lived in Dedham?

    Children:
    1. John the elder, b. say 1410. [4]
    2. (apparently) Thomas, b. say 1412. He is named in Suffolk Manorial Families[7] in this place as second son, and also identified as the Thomas [11] who died in 1495, but that Thomas was of a younger generation. So, if he existed at all, he probably lived and died in Kent.
    3. William, b. say 1415, d. in or after 1487, and by inference in or after 1502 [see 7]; unmarried. He was left 6s. 8d. yearly for 6 years in the will of his brother John, to pay the rent ("farm") of his mansion house.
  3. ROBERT GURDON (1.ii), b. say 1382, prob. d. 1439 at Dedham; m. between 1402 and 1408 ALICE TERRY, d. c. 1420, daughter of John & Isabel (Cancelor) Terry.

    When John Terry, whose death was presented 28 Dec 1402, died, he left to his wife Isabel a messuage and 3 acres in Dedham for life, with reversion to his daughter Alice. On 31 Jan 1408/9 Isabel Terry surrendered to Robert and Alice Gurdon a cottage and 5 acres enclosed of the tenement Gores, which Robert surrendered to William Thedam 3 Nov 1436.

    On 24 Sept 1409 the lady of the manor let to Robert 1½ acres of meadow in West Fen for 10 years. On 21 Oct 1412 John atte Ry let to Robert a messuage with 2 acres adjoining of the tenement Peryes for the life of John.

    When on 3 Jan 1429/30 the tenants of DC surrendered their premises to the lady who immediately regranted them, Robert Gurdon held a messuage and curtilage and two crofts of land of the tenement Peryes, a croft lying between the tenement Terrys and the tenement Gores, and a croft, messuage and two acres of land of the tenement Gores.

    On 5 March 1432/3 Robert let to farm to John Skulton 4 crofts, 8 acres, for two years.

    On 16 Nov 1439 it was presented that Alice had died 19 years earlier, who before her death surrendered to her husband for life 2½ acres of land of the tenement Peryes, a croft adjoining called Cristynes croft, 3 acres, with reversion to John Brown, her executor. Now (in 1439) John Brown surrendered these to John Mayston, and Robert Gurdon surrendered all his right in them to John Mayston. This being his last appearance, Robert probably died about then.

    On 24 April 1467 it was presented that John Mayston had lately died, who before his death surrendered all the land Alice wife of Robert Gurdon had held, to the use of William, Henry and John Warner and their heirs.

    Perhaps no issue, though he may have had a daughter who m. William Warner.
  4. JOHN GURDON the elder (2.i), b. say 1410, d. by 14 Jan 1487/8; m.(1) say 1440 MARGARET, prob. LOVEKYN, living 1472, daughter of William & Alice Lovekyn; (2) MAUD ............. , living 1487.[8]

    On 16 May 1470 William Webbe the younger and Richard Peverell the younger surrendered their half-shares of an acre and rod of land in Lorebrigge meadow to the use of John Gurdon the elder and Stephen Wodegate.

    On 31 July 1472 it was presented that William Lovekyn before his death had surrendered, by the hand of John Gurdon, an acre of meadow of the tenement Holtland to Alice his wife and Stephen Lovekyn his executors; and that Alice and her second husband Robert Merveyn had with Stephen Lovekyn surrendered the meadow to the said John Gurdon and Margaret his wife and the heirs and assigns of John. Also, outside that court John Moyse and William Whelere had surrendered 3 rods of meadow in Esthouse meadow in Dedham to John Gurdon the elder.

    On 12 Oct 1472 William Webbe the elder surrendered half an acre and one croft, 6 acres 3 rods of the tenement Hartestreteland, and a wood, 3 acres, late of Isabel Fybrigge, to John Gurdon the elder and to John Gurdon his son, to pay by instalments.

    On 21 Nov 1474 John Snow surrendered an acre and one rod of land of the tenement Seman, late of John Mayston, to John Gurdon.

    On 16 Jan 1480/1 Henry Vyne surrendered to John Gurdon the elder and John his son, and the assigns of John the elder, in the presence of John Gurdon the younger and John Gurdon the middler, a parcel of land of the tenement Mickelboys, one rod, late of Robert Copyn. At the same time Henry Vyne surrendered a meadow to John Gurdon the younger and to Robert his brother.

    On 20 Aug 1481 Thomas Wodehous surrendered the reversion, after the death of Agnes his mother, of a piece of meadow, one acre, of the tenement Hartestreteland and a piece of meadow of the tenement Fybrigges and four acres with grovet in a close called Leyghe to the use of John Gurdon the elder and Walter Brook.

    On 18 Sept 1486 William Marlere and Isabel his wife surrendered a cottage and one acre of land to John Gurdon the elder and to Robert his son.

    John's will dated 13 Aug 1487 was proved 14 Jan 1487/8.[9] He left money to pray for the souls of himself, his father John, mother Joan, and daughters Joan and Alice. When his death was presented to the DC manor court 6 May 1488, his lands held of that manor were to descend as follows:

    (a) A piece of meadow, one acre one rod, late of William Webbe and Richard Peverell, to John his son, and John son of the same John the younger.

    (b) An acre of meadow of the tenement Holtland, late Lovekyn, and an acre one rod of meadow of the tenement Seman, also to John his son and John son of the same John the younger.

    (c) With a surrender by Robert his son, present in court, a cottage and one acre of land late of William and Isabel Marlere, to John Gurdon the younger and John his son.

    (d) With a surrender by Walter Brook, present in court, a piece of meadow of the tenement Hartestreteland, one acre, a piece of meadow of the tenement Fybrigge, and four pieces of meadow of land and one grovet and pightell adjoining called Laye, in all 7 acres, late of Thomas and John Wodehous, to John the younger and John his son.

    (e) With a surrender by John his son, present in court, a parcel of the tenement Mickelboys, one rod, late of Henry Vyne, to Robert Gurdon and Thomas Webbe.

    (f) Three rods of meadow late of John Moyse and William Whelere in Esthouse meadow, to Robert Gurdon and Robert his son.

    The pedigree "Gurdon of Assington" [10] says his second wife Mathilda (sic) was "a clothier's widow in Dedham, who being well stock[ed] for ye cloathing trade she and her husband carried that trade until his death." If true, her first marriage was probably childless, because John named no stepchildren in his will.

    Children, all by Margaret, the order and placing of the daughters conjectural:
    1. Joan, b. say 1442; named as dead in her father's will 1487.
    2. Isabel, b. say 1445; mar Thomas Martyn of Wrabness, to whose son Thomas her father bequeathed his tenement called Bowyers in Sutton (probably Suffolk).
    3. Alice, b. say 1447; named as dead in her father's will, 1487.
    4. John "the younger", b. say 1450. [5]
    5. Robert, b. say 1453. [6]
    6. William, b. say 1456. [7]
  5. JOHN GURDON the younger (4.iv), b. say 1450, d. 1504; m. (1) ............, perhaps CLERK, daughter of William & Agnes Clerk; (2) by 1488 OLIVE, prob. LERLYNG, b. say 1464, daughter of John Lerlyng, named as his wife in 1496 and 1499 only; (3) JOAN HALK, daughter of Robert & Joan (Estwode) Halk.

    From 1472 to 1480/1 John received, as junior partner with his father, several pieces of land which he inherited after his father's death, but from 1477/8 he acquired more lands with his father which were not part of his father's estate, but as "senior" partner, his name appearing first in the presentments.

    On 8 Feb 1451/2 John Snowe surrendered a messuage built on, 4 acres of land formerly of Thomas Canceler and a croft called Caledon, 3 (4?) acres, to William and Robert Clerk, and John Halk released to them all his right and claim therein. On 19 July 1460, because William Clerk had died, they were regranted to Agnes late wife of William and to Robert Clerk. On 20 Jan 1477/8 Agnes Clerk widow and Robert Clerk surrendered them to John Gurdon the younger and John Gurdon the elder.

    On 16 Jan 1480/1 Rose widow of Hugh Leme surrendered all her right for life in a messuage with close adjoining, 3½ acres, called Bromesdowne late of William Warner, to John Gurdon the younger and John Gurdon the elder. On 20 Aug 1481 the Gurdons surrendered their rights in these premises to John Leme who before his death surrendered them to his wife Agnes for life with remainder to the right heirs of John Leme.[11]

    Also on 16 Jan 1480/1 Henry Vyne surrendered a meadow enclosed called Brook meadow, 7½ acres, formerly of Robert Dedham (doubtless an error for Robert Denham, as cited 3 Nov 1495 and 24 Apr 1509 below), to John Gurdon the younger and Robert Gurdon his brother.

    On 6 May 1488 when John and his brother and son were admitted to his father's lands John was party to two other surrenders. William Warner surrendered a cottage with curtilage adjoining, half a rod, and two crofts, 5 acres 1½ rods called Hellhouse tenement to Richard Richeman who immediately surrendered them to John, Stephen Dunton and John Gurdon the elder. The same William Warner and John his brother surrendered a croft called Sotilfield with an alnet adjoining, 7½ acres late of William Thedam, to Thomas Webbe and John Gurdon son of John Gurdon the elder.

    John the younger was on the FW homage 3 June 1488, listed just above Robert Halk.

    On 18 Oct 1492 it was presented that Robert Mouncke and his wife Agnes, widow of John Leme, now deceased, had not fulfilled conditions under which John Leme had had the rights to land surrendered by John Gurdon the elder and John Gurdon the younger. Therefore John Gurdon the younger was readmitted.

    On 3 Nov 1495 the FW jurors said that outside that court John Gurdon had sold 3 native crofts of land to Robert Denham without licence, so (the bailiff) was ordered to seize the same. (There were no further FW courts until 1518).

    On 30 June 1496 Stephen Dunton and Robert Lerlyng surrendered to John Gurdon the elder (sic) and Olive his wife for life, with reversion to Stephen Dunton and Robert Lerlyng for the use of Stephen, a parcel of the tenement Pertre late of James Lyems (DC). On 28 April 1494 this land had been surrendered to Stephen and Robert by Robert Gurdon [6, see below].

    On 2 Nov 1497 John Clerk and Agnes his wife surrendered 7 acres parcel of 15 acres of land called Caldwayland, to William Veysey and John Gurdon the younger. The same day John Gurdon the elder sold his reversion to Knights to William Veysey, painter, payable by instalments (DH).

    On 20 Jan 1497/8, described as John Gurdon the younger, he sold a parcel of Brook meadow, 2 acres, 8 feet, as enclosed, to John Thorne the younger (DC).

    On 23 May 1499 John Gurdon "late called John Gurdon the younger" and Olive his wife and Thomas Wodehouse surrendered a tenement called Knights and 3 rods of land to Stephen Dunton and Denise his wife during the lifetime of John and Olive, then to the heirs of John (DH). It was at this court that the death of Robert Lerlyng was presented, who was probably brother of Denise and Olive.

    On 18 May 1502 William Gurdon and John Gurdon, "late called John Gurdon the younger" surrendered a croft, one acre formerly of Stephen Sturgeon, to the use of Henry Grene and John Wright of Holton, Suffolk (DH).

    John's will dated 3 Apr 1504 was proved 21 May 1504.[12] As well as several religious bequests, including to the Grey, White and Black Friars of Ipswich and the Grey Friars of Colchester, he left £40 towards the making of a new aisle in the north side of Dedham Church, and £10 towards the building of a steeple there. His executors were John his son, Stephen Dunton and William Clerk.

    On 24 Apr[13] 1509 it was presented that Robert Denham with his unnamed co‑feoffees held one messuage, one close and one pightell, 3½ acres late of John Gurdon on condition he pay for it to John Gurdon by instalments, and afterwards John Gurdon died, and before his death made Stephen Dunton executor of his will. The conditional payments were in arrears at Michaelmas 1506, and therefore at this court Stephen Dunton as executor re-entered the messuage, close and pightell, and he surrendered Knights with 5 acres of land in Dedham to the use of William Veysey his heirs and assigns, on condition William Veysey pay Stephen Dunton £19 by instalments (DH).

    On 26 Oct 1517 it was presented that John had died "many years ago", and at his death held a parcel of tenement Mickelboys, one rod, and 3 rods of meadow in Estmeadow which Robert Gurdon had received in 1488; and two fields called Westfields, one of 9 acres, one of 10 acres, and 7 acres of meadow in Priorshall meadow, which Robert Gurdon had received with Thomas Ry by grant of the lady in 1492. John Gurdon, son of John, was his next heir and of full age, and was admitted.

    His widow Joan was left 40s. by her brother Robert Halk, yeoman, in his will dated 16 July 1510 proved 19 Oct 1510,[14] whose executors were Stephen Dunton, John Gurdon and William Clerk. Her will was dated 27 Dec 1512,[15] no probate.

    Olive, the name of John's second wife, is found in few families in Dedham. Hugh Stevene and his wife Olive acquired a messuage and 5 acres called Lacyes 16 Apr 1398. He was living 1412, but by 23 Nov 1422 his widow had remarried John Baker and was herself dead by 21 Oct 1449.

    William Stevene, b. say 1410, d. 1494, son and heir of Hugh and Olive, married Sabine Brook, and was father of Olive, b. say 1437, living 1498, who married three times. By her first husband Thomas Kyng, d. by 12 Oct 1472, she had Joan, heiress of her father, who m. between 21 Nov 1474 and 16 Jan 1480/1 Richard Strought. Her second husband was William Dunton of Hadleigh, Suffolk, who in his will dated 13 Jan 1486/7 proved 13 May 1488[16] named his wife Olive, mother of his two youngest sons John and Augustine, both under 24 in 1486/7. By 28 Nov 1498 Olive was wife of Thomas Goodolf, so was not the wife of John Gurdon between 1496 and 1499. However, she was the stepmother of Stephen Dunton who was so often named with John Gurdon from 1488 onwards. The only other Olive recorded in 15th and 16th century Dedham was the wife of Robert Gurdon [10]. If as deduced Olive was daughter of John Lerlyng and sister-in-law of Stephen Dunton, John Lerlyng's wife was probably related to, if not descended from, Olive wife of Hugh Stevene.

    Children by first wife: (Thomas [11] seems not to belong here. See "Unplaced" below)
    1. John "the elder", b. say 1476. [8]
    2. Joan, b. say 1481, named in her grandfather's will 1487, d. by 1504; unmarried.
    3. John "the younger", b. between 3 Apr 1484 and 3 Mar 1484/5. [9]

      Child probably by Olive:
    4. Christian, b. after 13 Aug 1487, not in her grandfather's will; m. Robert Cradock. Had two children in 1512.
  6. ROBERT GURDON (4.v), b. say 1453, d. 1502; m. ...............

    Robert was a clothier and dyer. After his father's death he was admitted to the parcel of Mickelboys and 3 rods of meadow in Esthouse meadow [4, entries (e) and (f) above], the former with Thomas Webbe, the latter with his own son Robert (DC). His father also left him a field late of John Taston in Dedham and all his tenement called Bollys in Langham; also all his easements in the dyeing house called the woad-house, evidently held of Dedham Hall.

    On 17 Oct 1491 James Liens surrendered a parcel of land built on, 3 rods, late of John Pertre, to Robert Gurdon and his brother John. On 28 April 1494 Robert surrendered this land to John, and John sold it to Stephen Dunton and Robert Lerlyng; but because it was done without licence, the bailiff was to seize the land. However, the transfers must have been allowed to stand because on 30 June 1496 Stephen Dunton and Robert Lerlyng surrendered a life interest in the land to John Gurdon the elder and Olive his wife, with remainder to themselves for the use of Stephen Dunton.

    Also on 17 Oct 1491 the lady granted two fields in a meadow called Priorshall meadow to Robert Gurdon and Thomas Ry and their heirs and assigns, yearly rent 32d. and suit of court. On 30 Jan 1496/7 Robert surrendered a field called Longefield, 12 acres, and 2 acres of meadow next to the meadow of Simon Crane that he had taken with Thomas Ry now dead, to Simon Crane and Anne his wife.

    On 13 May 1493 John Copyn and Agnes his wife surrendered a parcel of a field, 2 closes of the tenement Mickelboys, 3 rods, to Robert Gurdon and John his brother.

    On 30 Jan 1496/7 William Snowe of Kirby-le-Soken surrendered a yard and roofed granary to William Pertre and Robert Gurdon who were to pay by instalments. On 20 Jan 1499/1500 William Pertre and Robert Gurdon surrendered part of the granary to Hugh Turnour.

    On 20 Jan 1499/1500 it was presented that Robert Lerlyng had died leaving an acre of land, parcel of 30 acres called Gravelpitwent in Hallfield to John Herre, John Gurdon the younger (sic, should be elder) son of John Gurdon the younger, to Robert son of Robert Gurdon, and to John son of Thomas Webbe, Ralph Bolour, Thomas Denham, Richard Dunton and Robert son of Robert Veysey, their heirs and assigns. John Lerlyng also surrendered to John Hadleigh and Simon Crane, his executors, a piece of land called Overwent and Gravelpitwent, 29 acres, a piece of land, 10 acres in Hallfield called Cheldwellwent, and a piece of meadow in Broadmeadow, 2 acres, to the use of his last will, all of which John Hadleigh and Simon Crane surrendered to Robert Gurdon.

    On 18 May 1502 it was presented at DH manor court that William Gurdon the younger had died since 5 April 1502 seized of a cottage called Reymes with 3 acres of land, and Robert Gurdon his youngest brother was his next heir and of full age.

    On 17 Nov 1502 Robert Gurdon was recently deceased, having surrendered, by the hand of John Gurdon, the 10 acres called Cheldwellwent and half an acre of meadow to Robert Denham and Joan his wife, and the rest of his lands and tenements held of DC to John Gurdon his brother in the presence of Stephen Dunton and William Clerk.

    Also on 17 Nov 1502 (DC) Robert Gurdon, son of Robert deceased, surrendered to his uncle John Gurdon his rights to one rod of Mickelboys late of John Gurdon the elder [4], before of Henry Vyne; 3 rods of meadow in Estmeadow, before of Henry Vyne; two fields called Westfield, one of 9 acres, one of 10 acres; and 7 acres of meadow in the lady's hands called Priorshall meadow that Robert had taken in 1492.

    Children:
    1. Robert, b. say 1480. [10]
    2. Agnes, b. say 1482, named in her grandfather's will 1487; prob. d. young.
    3. Margaret; b. say 1485, named in her grandfather's will 1487; prob. d. young.
  7. WILLIAM GURDON [4.vi], b. say 1456, d. between 6 April and 18 May 1502; unmarried.
    His father left him £20, his tenement called Reymes, and "all things belonging to the arts both of a weaver and fuller".

    On 10 Jan 1501/2 (DC) William surrendered a cottage called Crabbeshall late of Marion Rand and John her son (which Marion and John had taken 28 June 1490 [court roll for this date missing] after the death of Walter Rand her husband) to John Wright of Holton, Suffolk and Henry Grene.

    On 18 May 1502 (DH) it was presented that William Gurdon the younger (whose uncle and namesake [2.iii] was presumably still alive) had died, who held a cottage called Reymes and 3 acres of land, and Robert Gurdon was his youngest brother and heir and of full age. On the same day "to this court came" William Gurdon and John Gurdon, "late called John Gurdon the younger" and surrendered a croft, one acre, late of Stephen Sturgeon, to Henry Grene and John Wright of Holton.

    The DH court rolls before 1493 have not survived, but the DC court rolls show how Crabbeshall cottage passed from Stephen Sturgeon in 1437 through a series of surrenders to Walter and Marion Rand, then to William Gurdon and his brother John the younger. Very likely, on 10 Jan 1501/2 when William surrendered Crabbeshall cottage in the DC manor court, he surrendered, outside the DH court because it was not sitting that day, the one-acre croft to John Wright and Henry Grene, and on 18 May 1502 it was his brother John the younger only who presented this joint surrender to the DH court.
  8. JOHN GURDON "the elder" [5.i], b. say 1476, apparently d. by 3 April 1504; unmarried.

    On or about 26 April 1498 Walter Brook, who died that year, sold to John Gurdon "the elder" the tenement Brokelhouse for 66s. 8d. (DC 28 Nov 1498).

    On 28 Nov 1498 the lady granted to John Gurdon son of John Gurdon the younger, and others named, two sandpits and a piece of land, one acre, parcel of Hallfield.

    On 20 Jan 1499/1500 it was presented that Robert Lerlyng who had lately died had surrendered certain land (described under [6]) to John Gurdon the younger and John Gurdon, and to Robert son of Robert Gurdon, evidently his executors. The same day John Warner surrendered, by the hand of Robert Gurdon, a tenement called Cheesehouse (but here called "Crowchehouse" in error: it was "Cheesehouse" when granted by the lady of the manor to John Warner (DC 18 Sept 1486), and again in 1508, below), 5 acres of land and meadow and a piece of meadow, 3 rods, called Peryes meadow late of Eden Warner, and Thomas Webbe and Robert Gurdon surrendered their rights to the said lands (as in 1488); also two closes called "Churchehousefield" (should be "Cheesehousefield"), 20 acres, and one close, 6 acres, called Losnefield held in fee to William Clerk, John Gurdon the elder son of John Gurdon the younger and John Warner to the use of William Clerk and his heirs.

    On 24 Oct 1508 William Clerk and John Gurdon surrendered the closes called Cheesehousefield and Losnefield that John Warner had surrendered to John Gurdon in 1499/1500 to Robert Warner (DC).

    Because his father in his will in 1504 named only one son named John, who was still under 20, this man appears to have been dead by then, which leaves the 1508 entry unexplained, there being no record of the transfer of that land from John [8] to his brother John [9].
  9. JOHN GURDON [5.iii], b. between 3 April 1484 and 3 Mar 1484/5, d. 1556; m. (1) say 1503 ANNE COLMAN, daughter of John & Katherine Colman of Little Waldingfield, Suffolk; (2) say 1516 ALICE ........., living 9 Jan 1537/8 (DH).

    John was in remainder to much land from his grandfather in 1487, being then under 16. In 1504 his father left him more land at age 20, which he must have attained by 3 Mar 1504/5 when (not described as "the younger") he was admitted as son and heir of his father to a croft lately built, 4 acres, formerly of William Snowe, and a croft called Caledon, 4 acres, late of Agnes Clerk, widow (DC). At the same court he surrendered to Stephen Dunton and William Clerk a parcel of land late Robert Copyn's, half an acre, called Mickelboys.

    On 26 May 1505 Robert Cranefen surrendered a croft, 2½ acres, to John Gurdon and Stephen Dunton (DH).

    On 8 Nov 1513 John surrendered 2 crofts called Wadesfield, 10 acres, late of Robert Halk, to Adam Nycoll and Joan his wife (DC).

    On 11 Nov 1516 it was presented that John Curde, lately dead, had surrendered a messuage with curtilage adjoining, half a rod, 2 crofts and half a rod of tenement Peryes late of Isabel Kebill, to John Gurdon, who immediately surrendered them to Robert Cradock, who was to pay by instalments (DC).

    On 26 Oct 1517 John was admitted to more of his father's lands, listed under [5] above (DC).

    On 12 April 1519 it was presented that about 18 years earlier John Halk and Robert Halk had surrendered to John Gurdon the younger [5] 8 acres of land, parcel of 3 crofts of a tenement called Gerolds, 40 acres, and at about that date William Bounde, gent, of Colchester and Thomas Glender sold to John the younger a pasture called Swetmansey, 6 acres, and a pasture called Mellefen, 8 acres, but now John Gurdon son of John [5] had taken all these his father's lands without licence, so the bailiff was ordered to seize the same into the lady's hands. These the lady granted to John 31 Dec 1520 (DC).

    Also on 31 Dec 1520 Robert Warner surrendered a parcel of close and land and an acre of pasture south of that close to John Gurdon and Robert Cradock to the sole use of John; and the lady granted to them all her fishing in the river of Dedham between defined limits, and delivered to them the custody of two white swans (DC).

    On 7 June 1525 the Queen, as lady of the manor, granted to John a piece of land, 3 perches by 2 perches at the south end of the lord's meadow, abutting upon Westfield (DH). On 9 Jan 1537/8 John had them regranted to himself and his wife Alice (DH).

    On 12 June 1527 John sold to John Cole and Joan his wife 12 acres of land with cottage late of Henry Vyne, 2 crofts of land called Stansworth, 3 acres, and a piece of land parcel of the tenement Bowyers, 1 acre (DH). On 7 Jan 1527/8 he, described as son of John Gurdon who had died 22 years earlier, surrendered to John Cole and his wife Joan one rod late of Henry Vyne which he had taken 26 Oct 1517, and 3 rods of Mickelboys that his father John and uncle Robert had taken 13 May 1493 (DC).

    On 3 June 1528 Robert Cradock sold to John a croft, 2 acres, and a piece of land now arable called Bowyers and one acre, parcel of 13 acres late of Robert Cranefen; and John sold to Robert Cradock a barn and half a rod, parcel of Bowyers (DH).

    On 7 Oct 1544 John surrendered the greater part of Brook Meadow, 6 acres, to Richard Lawrence, and John Sander sold to John an acre in the lady's meadow (ON).

    On 31 March 1547 John surrendered the pasture called Swetmansey, 3 acres, and the pasture called Mellefen, 8 acres that he had taken 31 Dec 1520, to William Littlebury, the benefactor of Dedham Grammar School (ON).

    According to Suffolk Manorial Families,[17] he was lord of Roushall manor in Clopton.

    The will of Anne's father John Colman of Little Waldingfield, Suffolk, dated 19 Dec 1505 was proved 5 Mar 1505/6.[18]

    Children by Anne:
    1. Robert, b. say 1503. [12]
    2. Joan, b. say 1506; m. (1) by 12 June 1527, as his second wife, John Cole, d. 1534; (2) William Cardinall of Great Bromley, Essex.
    3. John, b. say 1508, d. 1555/6; unmarried.

      Children by Alice:
    4. Anne, b. say 1518; m. Roger Wincoll of Little Waldingfield, Suffolk.
    5. Anne, b. say 1521; m. say 1550 William Butter. They were the parents of Pierce Butter who by his second wife Mary, daughter of John Wood of Dedham, was the father of Anne wife of John Coggeshall of Halstead, Essex, whose son John Coggeshall migrated to New England in 1632, and had many descendants.[19]
    6. Alice, b. say 1523; m. (1) ......... Bunne of Manningtree, clothier; (2) Robert Thorpe of Brent Eleigh Hall, Suffolk.
    7. Katherine, b. say 1525, d. by 1561; m., prob. in 1544, Richard Lawrence of Spexhall, Suffolk.
  10. ROBERT GURDON (6.i), b. say 1480, d. 1545/6; m. OLIVE .........., d. between 1546 and 1550.

    Between 15 Dec 1522 and 5 Jan 1523/4 John Grenleff sold to James Thompson a piece of land newly built, one rod, parcel of 7 acres of the tenement Blunts, which in 1516 had passed from the Lovekyn family, via John Thorne, to John Grenleff (DC 11 Nov 1516). Between 5 Jan 1523/4 and 17 Nov 1524 James Thompson sold the same, in the presence of Robert Cradock and John Gurdon, to the use of Robert Gurdon and Robert Gurdon his son (DC 17 Nov 1524).

    Robert died between 13 Oct 1545 and 30 Mar 1546 (ON), leaving the cottage and land called Thompsons to Olive for life, with reversion to his son Richard.

    The first name Olive, rare in Dedham, is discussed at the end of [5] above.

    The husband of Katherine Harre was said on 11 June 1522 (DH) to be Robert Gurdon, but this is an error. Her husband was Robert Bowden (DH 12 June 1527, DC 7 Jan 1527/8, as "Bolden", DC 18 Mar 1531/2).

    Child:
    1. Richard, b. say 1510. [13]
  11. THOMAS GURDON (son of which John? See "Unplaced" below), b. say 1465, d. 1495; m. say 1490, as her first husband, GRACE .............., b. say 1468.

    On 13 May 1493 (DC) Thomas Gurdon and Robert Halk did fealty for an acre late of William Webbe, previously held by John Michell, situated between meadows of men named Cranefen, Sturgeon and Smart, and the river. At the same court John son of Robert Brook surrendered three closes and a croft of land, 5 acres enclosed, to Robert Halk and Thomas Gurdon and the heirs and assigns of Robert.

    On 7 Oct 1493 (DH) Basilie widow and executrix of Thomas Bolour deceased, sold a tenement and 20 acres of land parcel of the tenement Greylands, to Robert Halk, Thomas Gurdon, John Rye and John Harre, their heirs and assigns.

    His will dated 12 Dec 1495 (sic) was proved 10 July 1495,[20] executors his wife Grace and Master John Barfoot, vicar of Dedham.

    Grace remarried by 23 May 1499 Simon Peverell (DH). On that date Simon and Grace his wife late wife of Thomas Gurdon and John Barfoot, clerk, surrendered a messuage called Boloffs with 4½ acres of land to the use of Robert Colby upon condition Robert discharge Grace and her assigns of the payment of money that Grace was to pay to John Gurdon father of Thomas, as in court 23 June 1495 (missing).

    On 26 May 1505 John Mynott, described incorrectly as executor of the will of Thomas Gurdon, unless the complainant was John Barfoot not Mynott, complained against John Gurdon in a plea of debt, against Agnes Edward in a plea of land of 5 virgates, and against John Greneleff in a plea of debt (DH). No details are given.

    Children:
    1. Katherine, b. say 1491; named in her father's will.
    2. Joan, b. say 1492; named in her father's will.
    3. Anne, b. say 1494; named in her father's will.
    4. (perhaps) a posthumous child, provided for in Thomas's will.
  12. ROBERT GURDON [9.i], b. say 1503, d. 5 Apr 1579 at Assington, Suffolk; m. as her second husband, ROSE (SEXTON) Appleton, d. 1593, daughter of Robert & Agnes (Jermyn) Sexton of Lavenham, Suffolk, and widow of William Appleton of Great Waldingfield, Suffolk.

    Robert was a counsellor at law.

    On 5 Jan 1523/4 Robert Petwell surrendered land for the use of the inhabitants of Dedham. Robert son of John Gurdon was a trustee (DC).

    On 7 Nov 1530 Ralph Warner and Isabel his wife surrendered an acre in Broadmeadow late of James Judy to John Cole, co-feoffee, and Robert son of John Gurdon. The same day Ralph and Isabel surrendered a tenement and 5 crofts late of William Starling and half of 4 crofts and a barn of tenement Blunts called Sawyers, and all the other half of Blunts, to John Cole and Robert Gurdon (DC).

    Robert became wealthy. He moved from Little Waldingfield to Assington Hall which he purchased from Miles Corbet. Feet of Fines for Essex[21] records sales by Robert and Rose of two manors and land in 4 parishes in 1547 (p.2); two manors and land in 14 parishes in 1548 (p.7); more land in 5 parishes in 1549 (p.15); and some land in Langham and Boxted in 1557 (p.65). With his son Robert he bought land in Langham, Ardleigh and Dedham in 1561 (p.91). He also bought land in Southminster in 1570 (p.146).

    Rose was the sixth daughter of Robert Sexton, whose will, in which his surname was written "Sexten", dated 25 Feb 1516/7 was proved 20 Mar 1517/8.[22]

    Robert Gurdon’s will dated 3 Apr 1578 was proved 12 May 1579.[23]

    Children:
    1. John, b. 1541. [14]
    2. Robert; d. unmarried.
    3. Elizabeth; m. as his first wife, Thomas Waldegrave of Bures, St Mary, Suffolk. Their eldest son, Thomas Waldegrave of Bures St Mary, d. 1642, m. Margaret Holmstead, daughter of John & Palladia Holmstead of Halstead. Their daughter Jemima, b. c.1606, m. 1626 Herbert Pelham of Bures St Mary. They emigrated to Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1639.[24]
  13. RICHARD GURDON [10.i], b. say 1510, d. 1549/50; m. MARGARET ............

    Richard inherited after his mother's death the cottage and one rod late Thompson's 30 Mar 1546 (ON). He died between 15 Oct 1549 and 7 Oct 1550, when Margaret was admitted to Thompson's as guardian for their two daughters during their minority (ON).

    Children:
    1. Bridget, b. 1544/5, aged 5 as at 7 Oct 1550. She may have m. say 1570 John Spenser of Stratford St Mary, Suffolk. He was buried there 4 Oct 1593, and his widow Bridget 7 Mar 1594/5. Her undated will was proved 10 Apr 1595.[25] On 2 Oct 1595 it was presented that Brigid Spenser widow had died since 2 Oct 1594 seised of a tenement with yard belonging. Richard Spenser was her youngest son and heir, aged 15 years (ON). It is not certain this Bridget had been a Gurdon. She is not in the 12 published volumes of Elizabethan Essex wills, nor in the will of any other resident of Stratford St Mary. [26]
    2. Anne, b. 1547/8, aged 2 as at 7 Oct 1550.
  14. JOHN GURDON [12.i], b. 1541, d. 21 Sept 1623; m. say 1561 AMY BRAMPTON, daughter and heiress of William Brampton of Letton, Norfolk.

    John was High Sheriff of Suffolk 1584. He witnessed the will of James Bragge of Stratford St Mary, Suffolk dated 18 Nov 1584 proved 12 Dec 1584.[27]
    His own will dated 6 Dec 1621 was proved 10 Oct 1623.[28]

    Children:
    1. Brampton. [15]
    2. Elizabeth; d. unmarried, buried in Brickling Chapel.
  15. BRAMPTON GURDON [14.i], d. 1647; m. (1) ELIZABETH BARRETT, daughter & coheiress of Edward & Elizabeth[29] (Lytton) Barrett of Belhouse in Alveley, Suffolk; (2) 8 July 1606 at Morley St Peter, Norfolk, MURIEL SEDLEY, bapt 20 Apr 1583 at Morley St Botolph, d. 22 Aug 1661 at Letton, Norfolk, daughter of Martin & Abigail (Knyvet) Sedley of Morley, Norfolk.[30]

    Brampton lived at Assington Hall. He was High Sheriff of Suffolk 1628. His will dated 19 Oct 1647, codicil 1 Feb 1648, was proved 15 May 1650.[31]

    Seven children by Elizabeth, of whom:
    1. John, d. 1679, was member of parliament for Suffolk in the Long Parliament.

      Six children by Muriel. Their youngest daughter was:
    2. Muriel, b. c.1613; m. 4 July 1633 at Allhallows, Honey Lane, London, Richard Saltonstall, bapt. 1 Oct 1610 at Almondsbury, Yorkshire, d. 29 Apr 1694 at Holme, Lancs. They emigrated to Watertown, Massachusetts, in 1631 with Richard's father, visited England in 1635, and on their return settled at Ipswich, Mass., but visited England again several times.[32]

 An outline chart showing the principal proposed relationships is given in Fig 1.

Unplaced:

John Gurdon "the middler" who with John Gurdon the younger [presumably 5] witnessed on 16 Jan 1480/1 the surrender by Henry Vyne of a parcel of land of the tenement Mickelboys to John Gurdon the elder and John his son (but how John the younger could be both a witness and joint recipient is unexplained).

John Gurdon who outlived his son Thomas [11]. Ostensibly this should be John the younger [5], who in his will would not have named Thomas's children if they had all died young; but Thomas was certainly alive, probably in his teens, when John [4] made his will in 1487, providing, by name, for all his living grandchildren, who did not include Thomas.

 

Fig 1.   Outline Gurdon family tree

 

gurdon-chart

 

 

Bibliography

Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, 3 vols. Boston, Ma, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995.

Chambers, Paul. Medieval Genealogy: how to find your medieval ancestors. Stroud: Sutton Publishing, 2005.

Emmison, F G, compiler. Wills of the county of Essex (England), Vol.1, Washington, DC: The National Genealogical Society, 1982; Vols.2-3, Boston, Ma: The New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1983, 1986; Essex Wills, Vols.4-12, Chelmsford: Essex Record Office, with the Friends of Historic Essex, 1987-2000.

Fitch, Marc & Frederick Emmison, eds. Feet of fines for Essex. vol.5, 1547-1580. Oxford, Leopard's Head Press, 1991.

Moriarty, George Andrews. “Butter.” NEHGR 76: 278-295, 1922

Moriarty, George Andrews. “Genealogical Research in England: The Gurdon Family.” NEHGR 92: 380-387; 93: 75-82, 170-175; 222-229; 94: 74-78, 180-182, 231-238, 364-370; 95: 69-72. Boston, 1938-1940.

Muskett, Joseph James. Suffolk Manorial Families, vol.1. Exeter, privately printed, 1900.

Richardson, Douglas. Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 2004.

Waters, Henry F. Genealogical Gleanings in England, vol.2. Boston, NEHGS, 1901 [reprinted Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1969].

Wood, Michael Johnson. "The Earliest Shermans of Dedham, Essex and their Wives." NEHGR 166: 245-258; 167: 35-54; 149-156; 213-224; 275-284; 168: 16-33. Boston, 2012-2014.

 

Appendix: References for the Court dates

Date

Manor court code

Archive ref
(TNA DL/30/ unless stated)

Religious calendar date

Regnal year

NEHGR ref

16 Apr 1398

DC

58/729

Tuesday after Close of Easter

21 Rich II

---

28 Dec 1402

DC

58/729

Thursday after Translation of St Stephen

4 Hen IV

---

22 April 1406

DC

58/729

Thursday before St George the Martyr

7 Hen IV

(1938)
92: 382

31 Jan 1408/9

DC

58/729

Thursday before Purification of the BVM

10 Hen IV

92: 383

24 Sept 1409

DC

58/729

Tuesday before Michaelmas

10 Hen IV

92: 382

6 Oct 1410

DC

58/729

Monday, St Faith the Virgin

12 Hen IV

92: 383

12 May 1411

DC

58/729

Tuesday after St John before Latin Gate

12 Hen IV

92: 383

21 Oct 1412

DC

58/729

Friday after St Luke the Evangelist

14 Hen IV

92: 383

23 Nov 1422

DC

59/730

Tuesday after Feast of All Saints

1 Hen VI

---

14 Nov 1426

DC

59/730

Thursday after St Martin the Bishop

5 Hen VI

92: 384

3 Jan 1429/30

DC

59/730

Tuesday before Epiphany

8 Hen VI

92: 384

5 Mar 1432/3

DC

59/730

Thursday, first week in Quadragesima

11 Hen VI

92: 384

3 Nov 1436

DC

59/730

Saturday after All Saints

15 Hen VI

92: 384

16 Nov 1439

DC

59/730

Monday after St Martin the Bishop

18 Hen VI

92: 385

21 Oct 1449

DC

59/730

Tuesday after St Luke the Evangelist

28 Hen VI

---

8 Feb 1451/2

DC

59/730

Thursday after Purification of the BVM

30 Hen VI

---

19 July 1460

DC

59/730

Saturday before St Margaret the Virgin

38 Hen VI

---

24 Apr 1467

DC

59/732

Friday, Morrow of St George the Martyr

7 Edw IV

92: 385

16 May 1470

DC

59/732

Wednesday 16 May

10 Edw IV

92: 385

31 July 1472

DC

59/732

Friday after St James the Apostle

12 Edw IV

92: 385

12 Oct 1472

DC

59/732

Monday after St Faith the Virgin

12 Edw IV

92: 386

21 Nov 1474

DC

59/732

Monday, Morrow of St Edmund, King & Martyr

14 Edw IV

92: 386

20 Jan 1477/8

DC

59/732

Tuesday in the Octave of St Hillary

17 Edw IV

92: 386

16 Jan 1480/1

DC

59/732

Tuesday after St Hillary

20 Edw IV

92: 386

20 Aug 1481

DC

59/732

Monday after the Assumption of BVM

21 Edw IV

92: 386

18 Sept 1486

DC

59/734

Monday after Exaltation of the Holy Cross

2 Hen VII

(1939)
93: 75

6 May 1488

DC

59/734

Tuesday after Apostles Philip & James

3 Hen VII

93: 75-6

3 June 1488

FW

Essex RO: D/DC14/14

Tuesday after the Feast of Holy Trinity

3 Hen VII

---

17 Oct 1491

DC

59/734

Monday before St Luke the Evangelist

7 Hen VII

93: 76

18 Oct 1492

DC

59/734

Thursday the Feast of St Luke the Evangelist

8 Hen VII

93: 76

13 May 1493

DC

59/734

Monday before the Ascension of Our Lord

8 Hen VII

93: 76-77

7 Oct 1493

DH

59/734

Monday after St Faith the Virgin

9 Hen VII

93: 80

28 Apr 1494

DC

59/734

Monday after St Mark the Evangelist

9 Hen VII

93: 77

3 Nov 1495

FW

Essex RO: D/DC14/14

Wednesday next after Feast of All Saints

11 Hen VII

---

30 June 1496

DC

59/734

Thursday after St Peter the Apostle

11 Hen VII

93: 77

30 Jan 1496/7

DC

59/734

Monday before Purification of the BVM

12 Hen VII

93: 77

2 Nov 1497

DH

59/734

Thursday after All Saints

13 Hen VII

93: 80

20 Jan 1497/8

DC

59/734

Saturday 20 January

13 Hen VII

93: 77

26 Apr 1498

DC

 

This is not a court date, but is cited in the 28 Nov presentment, where it is described as "about Thursday after the Feast of St Mark"

 

Not in the abstract at 93:77

28 Nov 1498

DC

59/732

Wednesday before St Andrew the Apostle

14 Hen VII

93: 77

23 May 1499

DH

59/734

Thursday in Pentecost week

14 Hen VII

93: 80-81

20 Jan 1499/1500

DC

59/734

Monday after St Hillary

15 Hen VII

93: 78

10 Jan 1501/2

DC

59/734

Monday after Epiphany

17 Hen VII

93: 78

5 Apr 1502

DH

59/734

Tuesday after the Octave of Easter

17 Hen VII

93: 81

18 May 1502

DH

59/734

Wednesday   in Pentecost week

17 Hen VII

93: 81

17 Nov 1502

DC

59/734

Thursday before St Edmund, King & Martyr

18 Hen VII

93: 78-79

3 Mar 1504/5

DC

59/734

Monday after St Matthias the Apostle

20 Hen VII

93: 79

26 May 1505

DH

59/734

Monday after Corpus Christi

20 Hen VII

93: 81-82

24 Oct 1508

DC

59/734

Tuesday after St Luke the Evangelist

24 Hen VII

93: 79

24 Apr 1509

DH

59/734

Tuesday before the Feast of St Mark
[but cited in NEHGR as
Wednesday before the Feast of St Martin]

24 Hen VII

93: 170-1

8 Nov 1513

DC

59/735

Tuesday after All Saints

5 Hen VIII

93: 171

11 Nov 1516

DC

59/735

Tuesday   the Feast of St Martin the Bishop

8 Hen VIII

93: 171-2

26 Oct 1517

DC

59/735

Monday before Apostles Simon & Jude

9 Hen VIII

93: 172

12 Apr 1519

DC

59/735

Tuesday 12 April

10 Hen VIII

93: 172

31 Dec 1520

DC

59/735

Monday, St Edward the King & Confessor

12 Hen VIII

93: 173

11 June 1522

DH

59/735

Wednesday in Pentecost week

14 Hen VIII

---

15 Dec 1522

DC

59/735

Monday 15 December

14 Hen VIII

---

5 Jan 1523/4

DC

59/735

Tuesday after St Edward the Confessor

15 Hen VIII

93: 173

17 Nov 1524

DC

59/735

Thursday after St Martin the Bishop

16 Hen VIII

93: 173

7 June 1525

DH

59/735

Wednesday in Pentecost week

17 Hen VIII

93: 227

12 June 1527

DH

59/735

Wednesday in Pentecost week

19 Hen VIII

93: 227

7 Jan 1527/8

DC

59/735

Tuesday after St Edward the Confessor

19 Hen VIII

---

3 June 1528

DH

59/735

Wednesday in Pentecost week

20 Hen VIII

93: 227-8

7 Nov 1530

DC

59/735

Monday after All Saints

22 Hen VIII

(1940)
94: 74

18 Mar 1531/2

DC

59/735

Monday after St Edmund, King & Martyr

23 Hen VIII

---

9 Jan 1537/8

DH

59/735

Wednesday after Epiphany

29 Hen VIII

93: 229

7 Oct 1544

ON

59/735

Tuesday after St Faith the Virgin

36 Hen VIII

---

13 Oct 1545

ON

59/735

Tuesday before St Luke the Evangelist

37 Hen VIII

---

30 Mar 1546

ON

59/735

Tuesday 30 March

37 Hen VIII

93: 224

31 Mar 1547

ON

59/735

Thursday after Annunciation of the BVM

1 Edw VI

93: 224

15 Oct 1549

ON

60/736

Tuesday before St Luke the Evangelist

3 Edw VI

---

7 Oct 1550

ON

60/736

Tuesday after St Faith the Virgin

4 Edw VI

94: 75

 

Notes


[1]     VCH Essex, 10: 154.

[2]     Paul Chambers, “Manorial Records,” in: Medieval Genealogy: how to find your medieval ancestors (2005), 48-71.

[3]     Chris Phillips, “Manorial Documents,” in: Some notes on medieval English genealogy.
http://medievalgenealogy.org.uk/guide/man.shtml [accessed March 2014]

[4]     Michael Johnson Wood, "The Earliest Shermans of Dedham, Essex and their Wives, "New England Historical and Genealogical Register (NEHGR) (2012-2014), 166: 245-258; 167: 35-54; 149-156; 213-224; 275-284; 168: 16-33.

[5]     Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633 (1995), 3 vols.

[6]     George Andrews Moriarty, “Genealogical Research in England: The Gurdon family” NEHGR 95 (1941): 69-73.

[7]     Joseph James Muskett, "Gurdon of Assington," in Suffolk Manorial Families 1 (1900), 286.

[8]    Joseph James Muskett, Suffolk Manorial Families 1 (1900), 276-7.

[9]    Translated from Latin and printed in the third person in Muskett, op.cit., vol.1 (1900), 274-5; and cited also by George Andrews Moriarty, “Genealogical Research in England: The Gurdon family,” NEHGR 94 (1940), 232-4, “from the Gurdon papers in the possession of Lord Cranworth.” Both copies are followed by the same citation from the will of William Mynott of Ipswich, Suffolk, 1498.

[10]    Joseph James Muskett, "Gurdon of Assington," in Suffolk Manorial Families 1 (1900), 286-8.

[11]    DC 18 Sept 1486.

[12]   PCC 5 Holgrave, PROB11/14, f. 38.
Henry F Waters, Genealogical Gleanings in England, vol.2 (1901 [reprinted 1969]), 234;
G Andrews Moriarty, “Genealogical Research in England: The Gurdon Family,” NEHGR 94 (1940): 231-8, at 234-5; Joseph James Muskett, Suffolk Manorial Families 1 (1900), 276-7.

[13]    Tuesday before the feast of St Mark, not Wednesday before the feast of St Martin, as in NEHGR (1939), 170-1.

[14]    PCC 32 Bennett, PROB11/16, f. 253.

[15]    Essex Record Office (Chelmsford), D/ACR 1/208.

[16]    PCC 14 Milles, PROB11/8, f. 110.

[17]    Muskett, op.cit. 1 (1900), 286.

[18]    PCC 4 Adeane, PROB11/15, f. 32; Waters, op.cit. 2 (1901), 949-50; Moriarty, op.cit. (1940), 236-7.

[19]    See George Andrews Moriarty, “Butter,” NEHGR 76 (1922): 278-295; and Robert Charles Anderson, “John Coggeshall,” in The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, 1 (1995), 405-9.

[20]    PCC 23 Vox, PROB 11/10, f. 181; Moriarty, op.cit. (1940), 232.

[21]    Marc Fitch & Frederick Emmison, eds., Feet of Fines for Essex, Vol.5, 1547-1580, (1991).

[22]    PCC 6 Ayloff, PROB11/19, f. 45; Muskett, op.cit. (1900), 289.

[23]    PCC 19 Bakon, PROB11/61. f. 155; Moriarty, op.cit. (1940), 235-6; Muskett, op.cit. (1900), 278-9; Waters, op.cit. (1901), 951-2.

[24]    Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry (2004), 166 & 573, and sources cited therein.

[25]    East Suffolk Record Office (Ipswich), IC/AA1/33/200.

[26]    The wills of the county of Essex (England) were compiled by F G Emmison and published as follows: Vol.1, The National Genealogical Society, Washington, DC (1982); Vols.2-3, The New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Mass (1983, 1986); Vols.4-12, Essex Record Office, in collaboration with the Friends of Historic Essex (1987-2000). Details are available from the author.

[27]    PCC 43 Watson, PROB11/67, f. 337.

[28]    PCC 99 Swann, PROB11/142, f. 254; Muskett, op.cit. (1900), 281-2; Waters, op.cit. (1901), 954-5.

[29]    Her will dated 27 May 1594 was proved 18 Oct 1594, PCC 71 Davy, PROB11/84, f.210b; Muskett, op.cit. (1900), 279-80.

[30]    Douglas Richardson, op.cit. (2004), 309.

[31]    PCC 68 Pembroke, PROB11/212, f. 120; Muskett, op.cit. (1900), 283-5; Waters, op.cit. (1901), 956-7.

[32]    Robert E Moody, ed. “The Saltonstall Papers, 1607-1815,” Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Vols, 80 and 81 (1972) I: 25-41, cited in Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration Begins, op.cit. (1995) 3: 1619;   Douglas Richardson, op.cit. (2004), 636 and sources cited therein.